The Concrete Initiative - Energy Performance of Buildings Directive

Energy efficient & low CO2 buildings with concrete

The review of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) provides us with an opportunity to raise the bar in terms of reducing the impact of buildings across Europe by making them more energy efficient. Whilst stakeholders agree that the existing Directive, dating back to 2010, has increased awareness about the importance of this issue,  experience in using the Directive has provided us with some food for thought as to how it could be further improved. With this in mind, the concrete sector has outlined the areas which it would like to see tackled and prioritised.

Energy storage in buildings – the potential in the Energy Package

Increasing renewable energy uptake will bring the need for greater energy flexibility and storage in order to match supply with demand. What if buildings could play this role, by offering thermal storage capacity that is currently untapped? This event will explore this concept, and make the link between the different elements of the Energy Package, from energy performance of buildings (EPBD) to electricity market design.

How can we make our buildings more energy efficient?

Over recent months, much attention has been given to the Energy Efficiency in Buildings Directive (EPBD).  Dating back to 2010, this legislation aims mainly to reduce the energy consumption of buildings.  The European Commission is due to come with a proposal for the revised Directive this autumn.  As a result, many organizations are already outlining their views on which direction this review should take. 

Parliament calls for more ambition on energy performance of buildings

On 23 June, the European Parliament adopted a resolution in relation to the Energy Efficiency Directive, in which it calls on the EU Member States to be more active and ambitious in the implementation of the Energy Efficiency in Buildings Directive. 

Parliament turns attention to household energy needs

On 26 May 2016, the European Parliament adopted a resolution which focuses on the cost of energy incurred by European households.  As noted by the Parliament, the current and ongoing energy transition, which involves moving away from a traditional and centralised energy generation model towards one which is more decentralised, energy-efficient and based significantly on renewable energy, does involve an increase in costs.

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